The Literary Sense E. Nesbit

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Published: April 4th 2012

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The Literary Sense  by  E. Nesbit

The Literary Sense by E. Nesbit
April 4th 2012 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | | ISBN: | 5.75 Mb

The Literary Senseby E. NesbitTHE UNFAITHFUL LOVERSHE was going to meet her lover. And the fact that she was to meet him at Cannon Street Station would almost, she feared, make the meeting itself banal, sordid. She would have liked to meet him inMoreThe Literary Senseby E. NesbitTHE UNFAITHFUL LOVERSHE was going to meet her lover. And the fact that she was to meet him at Cannon Street Station would almost, she feared, make the meeting itself banal, sordid.

She would have liked to meet him in some green, cool orchard, where daffodils swung in the long grass, and primroses stood on frail stiff little pink stalks in the wet, scented moss of the hedgerow. The time should have been May. She herself should have been a poem—a lyric in a white gown and green scarf, coming to him through the long grass under the blossomed boughs. Her hands should have been full of bluebells, and she should have held them up to his face in maidenly defence as he sprang forward to take her in his arms. You see that she knew exactly how a tryst is conducted in the pages of the standard poets and of the cheaper weekly journals.

She had, to the full limit allowed of her reading and her environment, the literary sense. When she was a child she never could cry long, because she always wanted to see herself cry, in the glass, and then of course the tears always stopped. Now that she was a young woman she could never be happy long, because she wanted to watch her hearts happiness, and it used to stop then, just as the tears had.He had asked her to meet him at Cannon Street- he had something to say to her, and at home it was difficult to get a quiet half-hour because of her little sisters.

And, curiously enough, she was hardly curious at all about what he might have to say. She only wished for May and the orchard, instead of January and the dingy, dusty waiting-room, the plain-faced, preoccupied travellers, the dim, desolate weather. The setting of the scene seemed to her all-important. Her dress was brown, her jacket black, and her hat was home-trimmed. Yet she looked entrancingly pretty to him as he came through the heavy swing-doors. He would hardly have known her in green and white muslin and an orchard, for their love had been born and bred in town—Highbury New Park, to be exact.

He came towards her- he was five minutes late. She had grown anxious, as the one who waits always does, and she was extremely glad to see him, but she knew that a late lover should be treated with a provoking coldness (one can relent prettily later on), so she gave him a limp hand and no greeting.Lets go out, he said.

Shall we walk along the Embankment, or go somewhere on the Underground?It was bitterly cold, but the Embankment was more romantic than a railway carriage. He ought to insist on the railway carriage: he probably would. So she said—Oh, the Embankment, please! and felt a sting of annoyance and disappointment when he acquiesced.They did not speak again till they had gone through the little back streets, past the police station and the mustard factory, and were on the broad pavement of Queen Victoria Street.



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